Literature

Mountain Ecology Articles (and articles folder) {link to Google Drive folder}

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/west­snow­fail/

http://www.fs.fed.us/nrs/news/review/review­vol11.pdf

http://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/2015/02/03/climate­change­poses­challenges­to­plants­and-animals/

Mountain ecology articles in Drive

Organized by filename inside Ecology Articles (mountain) folder in Drive.

Also see: Altitude Transect Studies Worldwide.

Note: most of these articles were provided by Dr. Christophe Randin from the Univ. of Lausanne, who co-authored most of the articles and is the chief scientific adviser to LAS’s LETS Study.

Are niche-based species distribution models transferable in space? – Randin – 2006 – Journal of Biogeography – Wiley Online Library.pdf

  • Summary only
  • “Overall, a limited geographical transferability calls for caution when projecting niche based models for assessing the fate of species in future environments.”

Carlson&al2014_DD.pdf

Accounting for tree line shift, glacier retreat and primary succession in mountain plant distribution models (Randin co-author)

  • Complete article
  • “ Aim: To incorporate changes in alpine land cover (tree line shift, glacier retreat and primary succession) into species distribution model (SDM) predictions for a selection of 31 high-elevation plants. Location Chamonix Valley, French Alps.”
  • “Main conclusions: We provide a framework for combining trajectories of land cover change with SDM predictions. Our pilot study shows that incorporating shifts in land cover improves habitat suitability predictions and leads to contrasting outcomes of future mountain plant distribution. Alpine plants in particular may lose less suitable habitat than standard SDMs predict due to 21st century glacier retreat.”

Climate change and plant distribution_ local models predict high-elevation persistence RANDIN – 2008 – Global Change Biology – Wiley Online Library.pdf (Randin author)

  • Abstract only
  • “Our results suggest elevation range as the main driver for the observed prediction discrepancies. Local scale projections may better reflect the possibility for species to track their climatic requirement toward higher elevations.”

Do the elevational limits of deciduous tree species match their thermal latitudinal limits? – Randin – 2013 – Global Ecology and Biogeography – Wiley Online Library.pdf

  • Summary only
  • “Aim: We compared the upper limits of 18 deciduous tree species with respect to elevation in Switzerland and latitude in Europe. We hypothesized that species would exhibit the same relative positions along elevation and latitude, which can be expected if species have reached their thermal cold limit along both gradients.”

Gehrig&al2007_JVS.pdf

Tree line shifts in the Swiss Alps: Climate change or land abandonment?

  • Complete article
  • “Conclusions: Land abandonment was the most dominant driver for the establishment of new forest areas, even at the tree line ecotone. However, a small fraction of upwards shift can be attributed to the recent climate warming, a fraction that is likely to increase further if climate continues to warm, and with a longer time-span between warming and measurement of forest cover.”

KleinRandinKorner_2015_Ecology_Letters.pdf (Randin co-author)

Water availability predicts forest canopy height at the global scale

  • Complete article (warning: dense!)
  • Abstract: “The strong association between forest height and P-PET (precipitation – potential evapotranspiration) provides a useful tool when studying future forest dynamics under climate change, and in quantifying anthropogenic forest disturbance.”

Kollas_JBiogeogr_2013.pdf (Randin co-author)

Spring frost and growing season length co-control the cold range limits of broad-leaved trees

  • Complete article
  • “Aim The aim of this study was to test, based on biological theory, which facet of temperature is most closely associated with the elevational and latitudinal low-temperature limits of seven European broad-leaved tree species.”
  • “Main conclusions: Low-temperature extremes during bud-break are the most likely candidates for controlling the elevational and latitudinal limits of broadleaved tree species. The absolute minimum temperature in winter and the mean temperature during the growing season are unlikely to constrain the cold limits of these species. Thus, the results call for the use of temperature data (extremes) during key stages of spring phenology when attempting to explain the low-temperature range limits and to predict the potential range shifts of deciduous tree species.”

Kollas&al2011_AnnBot.pdf (Randin co-author)

Unrestricted quality of seeds in European broad-leaved tree species growing at the cold boundary of their distribution

  • Complete article
  • “Conclusions: For the broad-leaved tree taxa studied, the results are not in agreement with the hypothesis of reduced quality of seeds in trees at their high-elevation range limits. Under the current climatic conditions, seed quality does not constitute a serious constraint in the reproduction of these broad-leaved tree species at their high-elevation limit.”

NormandRandin&al2013_PTRSB.pdf (Randin co-author)

A greener Greenland? Climatic potential and long-term constraints on future expansions of trees and shrubs

  • Complete article
  • “Warming-induced expansion of trees and shrubs into tundra vegetation will strongly impact Arctic ecosystems…. In conclusion, the projected climatic scope for future expansions is strongly limited by dispersal, soil development and other disequilibrium dynamics, with plantings and unintentional seed dispersal by humans having potentially large impacts on spread rates.”

Pottier_et_al-2013-Global_Ecology_and_Biogeography.pdf (Randin co-author)

The accuracy of plant assemblage prediction from species distribution models varies along environmental gradients

  • Complete article
  • “Aim: Climatic niche modelling of species and community distributions implicitly assumes strong and constant climatic determinism across geographical space. We tested this assumption by assessing how stacked-species distribution models (S-SDMs) perform for predicting plant species assemblages along elevation gradients.”
  • “Main conclusions: We provide a thorough evaluation of S-SDM emphasizing the need to carefully interpret standard evaluation metrics, which reflect different aspects of assemblage predictions. We further reported interesting patterns of change in S-SDM errors with changes in assembly rules along elevation. Yet, significant levels of assemblage prediction errors occurred throughout the gradient, calling for further improvement of SDMs, e.g. by adding key environmental filters that act at fine scales and developing approaches to account for variations in the influence of predictors along environmental gradients.”

Randin&al2013_GEB.pdf (Randin author)

Do the elevational limits of deciduous tree species match their thermal latitudinal limits?

  • Complete article
  • “Aim: We compared the upper limits of 18 deciduous tree species with respect to elevation in Switzerland and latitude in Europe. We hypothesized that species would exhibit the same relative positions along elevation and latitude, which can be expected if species have reached their thermal cold limit along both gradients.”
  • “Main conclusions: We provide a thorough evaluation of S-SDM emphasizing the need to carefully interpret standard evaluation metrics, which reflect different aspects of assemblage predictions. We further reported interesting patterns of change in S-SDM errors with changes in assembly rules along elevation. Yet, significant levels of assemblage prediction errors occurred throughout the gradient, calling for further improvement of SDMs, e.g. by adding key environmental filters that act at fine scales and developing approaches to account for variations in the influence of predictors along environmental gradients.”

Rapid Range Shifts of Species Associated with High Levels of Climate Warming

I-Ching Chen, et al; Science magazine; 2011

  • Abstract only
  • “The distributions of many terrestrial organisms are currently shifting in latitude or elevation in response to changing climate. Using a meta-analysis, we estimated that the distributions of species have recently shifted to higher elevations at a median rate of 11.0 meters per decade…. These rates are approximately two and three times faster than previously reported.”

Semidistributed rainfall–runoff hydrological model (PREVAH) and a spatially distributed snow-evolution model (SnowModel) for snow cover prediction in mountain ecosystems – Randin – 2014 – Ecohydrology – Wiley Online Library.pdf (Randin author)

  • Abstract only
  • “Our results allow for recommending the use of SnowModel in SDMs because it better captures persisting snow patches at the end of the snow season, which is important when modelling the response of species to long lasting snow cover and evaluating whether they might survive under climate change.”

Species distribution models reveal apparent competitive and facilitative effects of a dominant species on the distribution of tundra plants – Pellissier – 2010 – Ecography – Wiley Online Library.pdf (Randin co-author)

  • Abstract only
  • “Abiotic factors are considered strong drivers of species distribution and assemblages. Yet these spatial patterns are also influenced by biotic interactions. Accounting for competitors or facilitators may improve both the fit and the predictive power of species distribution models (SDMs)…. Our results are consistent with previous findings that both competition and facilitation structure plant distribution and assemblages in the Arctic tundra.”

Topo-climatic microrefugia explain the persistence of a rare endemic plant in the Alps during the last 21 millennia – Patsiou – 2014 – Global Change Biology – Wiley Online Library.pdf (Randin co-author)

  • Abstract only
  • “we propose a novel paradigm to explain plant persistence by highlighting the importance of supporting functions of MR when forecasting the fate of plant species under climate change.”
  • Not enough info in the abstract to understand article

Vitasse-Hoch-Randin_2012_JBio.pdf (Randin co-author)

Tree recruitment of European tree species at their current upper elevational limits in the Swiss Alps

  • Complete article
  • “Main conclusions: Under current conditions, neither seed dispersal nor seedling establishment constitutes a serious limitation of recruitment at the upper elevational limits of major European trees. The recruits found beyond the adult limits demonstrate the potential for an upward migration of trees in the Alps in response to ongoing climate warming.”
  • “The aims of this study were: (1) to assess current tree recruitment near the cold temperature limit of 10 major European tree species in the Swiss Alps, and (2) to rank species by the extent that their seedlings and saplings exceed the elevational limit of adult trees, possibly reflecting effects of the recent climate warming.”
  • “Methods For each species, occurrences were recorded along six elevational transects according to three size classes from seedlings to adult trees in 25-m elevation steps above and below their regional upper elevational limit.”

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